Disciplinary Pathways
to Service-Learning

PRINT AND ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES

Gail Robinson, Coordinator
Service-Learning Clearinghouse

American Association of Community Colleges
Washington, DC

Print Resources

Ayers, George E., and David B. Ray, eds. Service-Learning: Listening to Different
Voices
. Fairfax, Va.: United Negro College Fund, 1996.

800/332-8623.

Relates perspectives of educators from historically black colleges and universities regarding integrating service into academic curricula.

Barber, Benjamin R., and Richard M. Battistoni. Education for Democracy. Dubuque,
Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 1993.

800/228-0810.

Presents an anthology of readings on citizenship and social responsibility in a democracy, meant to provoke individual and group thought, discussion, and reflection.

Berry, Howard A., and Linda A. Chisholm. How to Serve and Learn Abroad Effectively:
Students Tell Students
. New York: Partnership for Service-Learning, 1992.
212/986-0989.

Advises students and recent graduates on service experiences abroad; contains application, preparation, and on-site suggestions.

Berson, Judith S. A Marriage Made in Heaven: Community Colleges and Service
Learning. Community College Journal, 64 (6), 1994: 14-19.
202/728-0200, ext. 254.

Describes growth and relevance of service-learning in community colleges; discusses how to start service-learning programs.

Bucco, Diana, ed. Building Sustainable Programs: A Guide to Developing and
Maintaining Service-Learning at Community Colleges
. Mesa, Ariz.: Campus
Compact Center for Community Colleges, 1995.

602/461-7392. Reveals lessons learned from institutions offering service-learning; discusses strategies for developing and maintaining programs; includes examples, models, and best practices.

Cha, Stephen, and Michael Rothman. Service Matters: A Sourcebook for Community
Service in Higher Education.
Denver: Education Commission of the States, 1993.
401/863-1119.

Compiles trends and statistics; national service initiatives; community service contacts; funding information; national organizations; more than 500 models and examples.

Coles, Robert. The Call of Service: A Witness to Idealism. New York: Houghton Mifflin
Co., 1993.

212/420-5800.

Explores idealism in individuals and society, and community service as a means of realization. Includes stories of individual involvement, achievement, and satisfaction, as well as cynicism, anger, and despair.

Community Colleges and Service Learning. Washington, D.C.: American Association of
Community Colleges, 1995.

202/728-0200, ext. 254.

Describes in detail steps community colleges can take to implement service-learning.

Delve, Cecilia, Suzanne D. Mintz, and Greig M. Stewart. Community Service as Values
Education.
New Directions for Student Services, no. 50. San Francisco: Jossey-
Bass, 1990.

800/956-7739

Addresses how service-learning programs can foster studentsı moral development and sense of civic responsibility.

Federal Work-Study and Community Service: A Campus Compact Guide. Denver:
Education Commission of the States, 1994.

401/863-1119.

Reviews federal work-study legislation and its requirement of designated funds for community service work-study jobs; recommends strategies for implementation.

Galura, Joseph, Jeffrey Howard, Dave Waterhouse, and Randy Ross, eds. Praxis III:
Voices in Dialogue.
Ann Arbor: OSCL Press, 1995. 313/763-3548.

Describes service-learning courses and activities in detail; current thought and theory; reflection by course alumni.

Galura, Joseph, Rachel Meiland, Randy Ross, Mary Jo Callan, and Rick Smith, eds.
Praxis II: Service-Learning Resources for University Students, Staff and Faculty.
Ann Arbor: OSCL Press, 1993.

313/763-3548.

Discusses establishing a service-learning course and a faculty committee; advocating for and promoting service-learning on a university campus; pilot activities; curricular and co-curricular projects.

Giles, Dwight E., Jr., and Janet Eyler. The Impact of a College Community Service
Laboratory on Studentsı Personal, Social, and Cognitive Outcomes. Journal of
Adolescence
17 ,1994, 327-339.

011-44-181-300-3322 (London).

Details central issues in outcomes research.

Goldsmith, Suzanne. Journal Reflection: A Resource Guide for Community Service
Leaders and Educators Engaged in Service Learning.
Washington, D.C.: American
Alliance for Rights & Responsibilities, 1995.

202/785-7844.

Relates the history and value of journals for service reflection; details various types, formats, methods, and examples of journal reflection techniques.

A Grantmaker's Guide to National and Community Service. Washington, D.C.: Council
on Foundations, 1994.

202/466-6512.

Provides information on national, state, and local foundations that award grants for national and community service efforts; includes program descriptions.

Henry, Roger. A Service Learning Center: A Practitioner s Workbook. Cocoa, Fla.:
Brevard Community College/Florida Campus Compact, 1995.

407/632-1111, ext. 62410.

Contains practical tips and suggestions for developing a service-learning program.

Howard, Jeffrey, ed. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning. Ann Arbor:
OSCL Press, 1994, 1995.

313/763-3548.

Includes articles on research, pedagogy, theory, and related issues.

------. Praxis I: A Faculty Casebook on Community Service-Learning. Ann Arbor: OSCL
Press, 1993.

313/763-3548.

Considers undergraduate and graduate course models of service-learning in a variety of disciplines; includes course structure, syllabi, outcomes, and assessment.

Jackson, Katherine, ed. Redesigning Curricula: Models of Service Learning Syllabi.
Providence: Campus Compact, 1994.

401/863-1119.

Includes adaptable model syllabi from several disciplines at different types of institutions.

Jacoby, Barbara, and Associates. Service-Learning in Higher Education: Concepts and
Practices.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996.

800/956-7739

Outlines foundations and principles of viable service-learning programs;includes guidelines for program design and administration, types of service experiences, curricular integration, and institutionalization.

Kendall, Jane, ed. Combining Service and Learning: A Resource Book for Community and Public Service. 3 vols. Raleigh, N.C.: National Society for Experiential Education,
1990.

919/787-3263.

Includes practical issues and ideas for programs and courses; curricular integration; recruitment; evaluation and assessment; legal issues; principles of good practice; theories; rationales; research.

Kniseley, MacGregor. Knowing Youıve Made a Difference: Strengthening Campus-Based
Mentoring Programs through Evaluation and Research.
Denver: Education
Commission of the States, 1990.

401/863-1119.

Describes how to conduct an effective evaluation of a campus-based mentoring program in order to strengthen and refine it.

Kretzmann, John P., and John L. McKnight. Building Communities from the Inside Out:
A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Communityıs Assets.
Chicago: ACTA
Publications, 1993.

800/397-2282.

Summarizes successful, practical, and useful examples of community-building initiatives. Describes connecting community needs and assets through local citizens associations, community groups, government, business, philanthropy, cultural organizations, and educational and religious institutions.

Kupiec, Tamar Y., ed. Rethinking Tradition: Integrating Service with Academic Study on
College Campuses.
Denver: Education Commission of the States, 1993.
401/863-1119.

Examines strategies and rationale for service-learning programs; service-learning as effective pedagogy; institutional development; program design; sample course syllabi.

LappŽ, Frances Moore, and Paul Martin Du Bois. The Quickening of America: Rebuilding
our Nation, Remaking our Lives.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994.

415/433-1767.

Chronicles individuals who are successfully tackling societyıs problems and challenges; addresses the skills needed to effect change and solve problems; includes reflective tasks and questions for the reader.

Mapping the Geography of Service on a College Campus: Strategic Questions about the
Institution, Stakeholders, Philosophies and Community Relationships.
Providence:
Campus Compact, 1994.

401/863-1119.

Provides a brief framework for assessing the state of campus service initiatives.

Markus, G.B., Howard, J.P.F., and King, D.C. Integrating Community Service and Classroom Instruction Enhances Learning: Results from an Experiment. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 15, 1993, 410-419.

202/223-9485.

Describes results of research on student outcomes, including effects for both course learning outcomes and attitudinal/cognitive/values measures.



Parsons, Michael H., and C. David Lisman, eds. Promoting Community Renewal
Through Civic Literacy and Service Learning.
New Directions for Community
Colleges, no. 93. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996.

800/956-7739

Portrays a critical role of community colleges in the twenty-first century as enhancing civic literacy through community-based programming and service-learning.

Raybuck, Jodi, ed. Expanding Boundaries: Serving and Learning. Washington, D.C.:
Corporation for National Service, 1996.

410/290-3839.

Examines service-learning efforts at Learn and Serve America: Higher Education grantee institutions; discusses lessons learned and tools used in several projects.

Robinson, Gail, and Lynn Barnett. Service Learning and Community Colleges: Where We
Are.
Washington, D.C.: American Association of Community Colleges, 1996.
202/728-0200, ext. 254.

Summarizes and analyzes service-learning data and trends on community college campuses.

Seidman, Anna, and Charles Tremper. Legal Issues for Service-Learning Programs: A
Community Service Brief.
Washington, D.C.: Nonprofit Risk Management
Center, 1994.

202/785-3891.

Provides general guidance on legal liability, negligence, insurance, and risk management; suggests strategies to prevent legal problems; offers suggestions for adhering to pertinent laws and regulations.

Sigmon, Robert. Linking Service with Learning. Washington, D.C.: Council of
Independent Colleges, 1994.
202/466-7230.

Relates service-learning background, typology, relationship identification, and suggestions for linking service with learning.

Silcox, Harry C. A How to Guide to Reflection: Adding Cognitive Learning to
Community Service Programs.
Philadelphia: Brighton Press, 1993.

215/357-5861.

Details the need for reflection in service-learning; learning environments; reflective teaching methods; the reflection process; research on reflection activities.

Troppe, Marie, ed. Connecting Cognition and Action: Evaluation of Student Performance
in Service Learning Courses.
Providence: ECS/Campus Compact, 1995.

401/863-1119.

Describes the importance and potential difficulty of evaluation in service-learning courses; offers evaluation methods and a model of the development of reflective judgment to assist faculty in assessing studentsı cognitive gains.

Vineyard, Sue. Evaluating Volunteers, Programs, and Events. Downers Grove, Ill.:
Heritage Arts Publishing, 1994.

708/964-1194.

Relates methods of and reasons for evaluating volunteer activities; addresses reflection as the evaluative component of service-learning.

Walsh, Jim. Community and Volunteer Service: A Resource Guide for Community
Colleges.
Providence: Campus Compact, 1991.

401/863-1119.

Provides information and resources for community colleges establishing service programs.

Westacott, Beverly M., and Carol R. Hegeman, eds. Service Learning in Elder Care: A
Resource Manual.
Albany, N.Y.: Foundation for Long Term Care, 1996.

518/449-7873.

Describes elder care project as a model for service-learning programs; includes case studies, curricular design, journal reflection, project evaluation, and mentoring information.

Willette, Zac, Michael Magevney, and Laura Mann. Curriculum-Based Alternative Breaks.
Nashville: Break Away:
The Alternative Break Connection, 1994.

615/343-0385.

Recommends ideas and sources for alternative college breaks combined with academic courses; focuses on why and how to do service; includes profiles of participating colleges.

Organizational Resources

American Association of Community Colleges Service-Learning Clearinghouse
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 410
Washington, DC 20036-1176
Phone 202/728-0200 ext. 254
Fax 202/833-2467
E-mail grobinson@aacc.nche.edu

Campus Compact National Center for Community Colleges
1833 West Southern Avenue
Mesa, AZ 85202
Phone 602/461-7392
Fax 602/461-7816
E-mail conss@mc.maricopa.edu

Campus Outreach Opportunity League
1511 K Street, NW, Suite 307
Washington, DC 20005
Phone 202/637-7004
Fax 202/637-7021
E-mail cool2you1@aol.com

Corporation for National and Community Service
1201 New York Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20525
Phone 202/606-5000

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education
U.S. Department of Education
ROB-3, Room 3100
7th and D Streets, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5175
Phone 202/708-5750

The Invisible College
Portland State University
635 SW Harrison
Portland, OR 97207
Phone 503/725-3705
Fax 503/725-5850
E-mail alanz@sba.pdx.edu

National and Community Service Coalition
409 3rd Street, NW, Suite 200
Washington, DC 20024
Phone 202/488-SERV
Fax 202/488-1004
E-mail ncsc@cais.com

Nonprofit Risk Management Center
1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, #900
Washington, DC 20036
Phone 202/785-3891

National Service-Learning Cooperative (K-12) Clearinghouse
University of Minnesota
1954 Buford Avenue, Room R290
St. Paul, MN 55108
Phone 800/808-7378
E-mail serve@maroon.tc.umn.edu

National Society for Experiential Education
3509 Haworth Drive, Suite 207
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone 919/787-3263
Fax 919/787-3381
E-mail nsee@mercury.interpath.com

The Partnership for Service-Learning
815 Second Avenue, Suite 315
New York, NY 10017-4594
Phone 212/986-0989
Fax 212/986-5039

Points of Light Foundation
1737 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
Phone 202/223-9186

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